Rolling With It

Natural Help for Plantar Fasciitis

Natural Help for Plantar Fasciitis

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis occurs in in the heel and sole of the feet. When you first get up after a night’s sleep or a daytime rest, you experience sharp pain when putting weight on these areas. Flexing your foot may also trigger pain from plantar fasciitis. About one-third of those with the condition are affected in both feet but most have it in only one. Plantar fasciitis develops slowly over time, usually originating in the heel and moving forward toward the toes. You can often alleviate your symptoms without extreme measures like surgery. The name of the malady comes from the plantar area, or sole, of your foot and the connecting tissue, or fascia, that extends from your heel to your toes. The tissue sustains minute tears that become inflamed, thus causing pain along the length of your foot.

What Are the Symptoms?

Pain in the heel and sole of your foot when you walk is the primary symptom of plantar fasciitis. People typically do not run a fever or have other noticeable symptoms. The most severe pain occurs when you first get up, and it tends to lessen as the fascia and muscles warm up. However, if you remain on your feet for most of the day, the pain will worsen as the day goes on. Climbing stairs may cause a flare-up. Getting off your feet will ease the discomfort. If the pain continues during the night when you are in bed, you may not have plantar fasciitis. Instead, you may have arthritis, a pinched nerve, tarsal tunnel syndrome or a foot injury.

What is Myofascial Release?

What is Myofascial Release?

What Does Myofascial Mean?

Beneath your skin, each muscle, blood vessel, nerve and organ are connected with a translucent wrap of fascia, a dense web of organic threads that covers and penetrates each component, much like the membrane of an orange. The fascia is designed to help you move smoothly without friction. 

“Myo” refers to muscles. When you feel muscle irritation, it could be due to fascial restrictions, which cause areas of tightness and irritation. Myofascial restrictions can create tensile pressure up to 2,000 pounds per square inch, causing pain and immobility.

Understanding Gamer's Thumb, Prevention, and Treatment

Understanding Gamer's Thumb, Prevention, and Treatment

Gamer's Thumb involves the inflammation of the fluid-filled sheath or tunnel (called the synovium) that surrounds the two tendons that control movement of the thumb. You may hear it referred to as flexor tenosynovitis, stenosing tenosynovitis, de Quervain's tenosynovitis (dih-kwer-VAINS ten-oh-sine-oh-VIE-tis), or de Quervain syndrome.

Two common stenosing tenosyonvitis diagnoses are:

  • DeQuervain's Syndrome - this involves the first dorsal compartment of the wrist
  • Trigger finger - this occurs when a fibrous nodule develops in the digital flexor tendon
5 Key Moves: How to Foam Roll to Prevent Tennis Elbow

5 Key Moves: How to Foam Roll to Prevent Tennis Elbow

What is tennis elbow? OrthoInfo describes the condition in the following way:

"Tennis elbow, or lateral epicondylitis, is a painful condition of the elbow caused by overuse. Not surprisingly, playing tennis or other racquet sports can cause this condition. However, several other sports and activities can also put you at risk."

The five recommended foam rolling exercises include wrist extensors, wrist flexors, pronators, supinators, and palms.

Understanding Trigger Finger and Trigger Finger Exercises

Understanding Trigger Finger and Trigger Finger Exercises

What is Trigger Finger?

Trigger finger is a condition that causes one of your fingers to remain stuck in a bent position. Another term for trigger finger is stenosing tenosynovitis (stuh-NO-sing ten-o-sin-o-VIE-tis). Your finger might straighten out with a snap, like a trigger being pulled and released (MayoClinic.org).

What Causes Trigger Finger?

Inflammation will cause a narrowing of the space within the sheath surrounding the tendon in the afflicted finger. If severe, this finger can remain locked in a bent position.

Who is at Risk?

Women, those with diabetes or rheumatoid arthritis, and those working in jobs with repetitive gripping actions are at highest risk for developing trigger finger.

Do Foam Rollers Really Work?

Do Foam Rollers Really Work?

In prehab, rehab, and training environments foam rollers are used to restore muscles, ligaments, tendons, fascia, and soft-tissue extensibility. A recent study involving passive ankle dorsiflexion in 11 adolescent athletes,  concluded that combining foam rolling with static stretching provided the greatest effect on the range of motion in an athlete. The study concluded that there was an increase in range of motion of 6.2% when only static stretching was done and an increase of 9.1% when static stretching was combined with foam rolling. So, though all three cases (static stretching, foam rolling, and foam rolling plus static stretching)all led to acute increases in flexibility, it was the additive effect of foam rolling and static stretching that showed the best improvement in range of motion for these athletes.

Because flexibility is associated with arterial distensibility, researchers have also been interested in looking into foam rolling and arterial stiffness. Another recent study showed that foam rolling reduces arterial stiffness and improves vascular endothelial function.

5 Tips: How to Choose a Foam Roller

5 Tips: How to Choose a Foam Roller

Exercise is a big part of maintaining and reclaiming health. Foam rolling now goes hand in hand (no Rist RollerTM pun intended) with both preparing for regular exercise and the healing process of rehabilitation. Foam rolling is simply a self-myofascial release (SMR) process; it helps release restrictions based on the amount of body pressure you use when rolling. Additionally, the amount of pressure you'll feel will depend on the density of the foam you are using.