Rolling With It

Connect With Purpose

Connect With Purpose

It's a new year, and as we see messages of "seek to find meaning, not happiness," floating around social media, I know we're all thinking "Ah, yes that makes sense, because if you find meaning, happiness is likely going to come along for the ride." In founding RistRoller with Jade, I was able to connect to purpose more deeply. That tagline "feel awesome, do awesome," is really an extension of my life's purpose: helping others feel awesome so they can do awesome ties into my sense of purpose which is to help others claim wellness. (And no, "Others" is not a reference to LOST, though I suppose it is now, now that I capitalized the O. "Others" is meant to include more than just humans.)

    Overworking - Bad for You, Bad for Business

    Overworking - Bad for You, Bad for Business

    Are you an over-worker? Do you find yourself waking up early to get a head start on the work day, working through lunch, or working into the evening hours: rather than spending time with loved ones? According to some studies, you are not alone. Many Americans have taken to the practices of overwork, to the detriment of their wellbeing and/or productivity levels. 
    7 Tips to Avoid Text Neck and Texting Thumb

    7 Tips to Avoid Text Neck and Texting Thumb

    More than half of teens with smartphones say texting is their main method of communication. With more than 75 percent of all teens owning smartphones, according to Pew Research Center, it seems safe to say that texting is a firmly established trend. What’s more, by some estimates, adults spend an average of 11 hours each day using electronic media. As a result, people of all ages are experiencing physical effects that really didn’t exist 20 years ago, such as text neck and texting thumb. These physical conditions are the direct result of overuse of electronic devices or a lack of awareness while using them. The good news is that you can avoid the physical discomfort of text fatigue by making a few elemental changes.

    The Uplifting Tale of OSS Weightlifting

    The Uplifting Tale of OSS Weightlifting

    A decade ago, a Men’s Health article caught the eyes of retired federal agent Mario Dispenza, who was, at the time, looking for something new in training. Having been active with cardio and weights all his life, he was drawn to the claim “the greatest workout known to man,” so he picked up their piece about Olympic Weightlifting. Mario found the  sport to be quite captivating, and the article spurred him to find a local USAW coach. Soon he was hooked.

    Olympic Weightlifting is about sport: the bar is lifted overhead in a fast, explosive movement. Body mechanics are key. Olympic Weightlifters train to become more efficient with the bar, to better harness their strength and grow their personal records (PR’s).  In the sport of Olympic weightlifting, there are two lifts: the snatch and the clean and jerk.  The snatch is performed with a wide grip.  The bar is lifted overhead in one single motion.  

    Natural Help for Plantar Fasciitis

    Natural Help for Plantar Fasciitis

    What is Plantar Fasciitis?

    Plantar fasciitis occurs in in the heel and sole of the feet. When you first get up after a night’s sleep or a daytime rest, you experience sharp pain when putting weight on these areas. Flexing your foot may also trigger pain from plantar fasciitis. About one-third of those with the condition are affected in both feet but most have it in only one. Plantar fasciitis develops slowly over time, usually originating in the heel and moving forward toward the toes. You can often alleviate your symptoms without extreme measures like surgery. The name of the malady comes from the plantar area, or sole, of your foot and the connecting tissue, or fascia, that extends from your heel to your toes. The tissue sustains minute tears that become inflamed, thus causing pain along the length of your foot.

    What Are the Symptoms?

    Pain in the heel and sole of your foot when you walk is the primary symptom of plantar fasciitis. People typically do not run a fever or have other noticeable symptoms. The most severe pain occurs when you first get up, and it tends to lessen as the fascia and muscles warm up. However, if you remain on your feet for most of the day, the pain will worsen as the day goes on. Climbing stairs may cause a flare-up. Getting off your feet will ease the discomfort. If the pain continues during the night when you are in bed, you may not have plantar fasciitis. Instead, you may have arthritis, a pinched nerve, tarsal tunnel syndrome or a foot injury.

    Is Active Sitting Good for You?

    Is Active Sitting Good for You?

    Yes, Active Sitting Can Benefit Your Body

    People with desk jobs are tired of sitting all day. So much so, in fact, that many are bringing their gym equipment to work with them in the effort to combine the daily grind with fitness. In a surprising leap of innovation, people from executives to administrative assistants are swapping out their office chairs for fitness balls in the effort to tone their glutes and quads while alleviating the aches and pains that sedentary work can cause, says Prevention magazine.

    Why Traditional Office Chairs Cause Pain

    One reason office chairs seem so uncomfortable is the result of poor posture. When you sit down to work each day, your body settles in, your abdominal muscles relax and your core muscles take a break. The seat of the chair, no matter how ergonomically designed, bears the brunt of your body weight. Poor posture means your body is not naturally aligned, and when you sit for extended periods in misalignment, your muscular and skeletal structures suffer, according to Prevention.


    Sitting is the New Smoking?

    Sitting is the New Smoking?

    You might have heard “sitting is the new smoking” lately (or seen the hashtag #sittingisthenewsmoking), and if you haven't, it’s probably time to research it for yourself and make decisions with the facts it mind.

    
To compare sitting to smoking may seem like a harsh comparison because 480,000 people a year die from smoking, and you might be thinking “Are 480,000 people really dying a year or will be dying per year from sitting?”

    Well… No. Not exactly, but perhaps we should all start reflecting on how many sedentary hours in our lives we can begin to modify.

    For a brief time in my life I had a personal trainer who always steered me in the right direction. One day he asked me who had a better metabolism: middle school teachers or individuals who spent two hours at the gym every night? Anticipating the plot twist, I firmly stated “teachers” with as much false confidence one could have with fingers spread in high plank and watching beads of her own sweat fall to the mat 90 seconds in.

    “Right, but do you know why?” He asked, and of course, I didn’t.

    Yay! It's National Employee Wellbeing Month!

    Yay! It's National Employee Wellbeing Month!

    At RistRoller®, our philosophy can be summed up as: Feel awesome. Do awesome. And what better time to share some of our thoughts and antics than during National Employee Wellbeing Month?

    Onsite Fitness Facilities and Offsite Antics

    An onsite fitness facility doesn't have to look like a hotel gym. Maybe it looks like a pull up bar over a doorway... or a room full of balls. Sure I meant giant yoga balls when I wrote that, but not why not go all out with a Chuck E. Cheese style ball pit?

     

    What is Myofascial Release?

    What is Myofascial Release?

    What Does Myofascial Mean?

    Beneath your skin, each muscle, blood vessel, nerve and organ are connected with a translucent wrap of fascia, a dense web of organic threads that covers and penetrates each component, much like the membrane of an orange. The fascia is designed to help you move smoothly without friction. 

    “Myo” refers to muscles. When you feel muscle irritation, it could be due to fascial restrictions, which cause areas of tightness and irritation. Myofascial restrictions can create tensile pressure up to 2,000 pounds per square inch, causing pain and immobility.

    Guitar Wrist Pain and Guitar Tendonitis Treatments

    Guitar Wrist Pain and Guitar Tendonitis Treatments

    As a guitarist, are you experiencing pain due to consistent guitar playing? Guitar Tendonitis may occur if you play a guitar professionally or strictly for leisure purposes. Tendonitis is common among tennis players, golfers, pitchers, swimmers, jumpers, and guitarists. Symptoms may include a dull ache, tenderness, or mild swelling. This is generally caused by repetitive use of the shoulders, elbows, wrists, knees, or heels. Most cases can be resolved through natural methods such as rest and stretching.

    Understanding Dupuytren's Contracture and Its Treatment

    Understanding Dupuytren's Contracture and Its Treatment

    Dupuytren’s contracture, also called “Viking’s Disease,” is a condition of the hand affecting the underlying palm tissue. It is not the same as Dupuytren’s Disease, which can affect other parts of the body. As Dupuytren’s contracture slowly progresses, the palmar fascia gets thicker and shortens, ultimately forming fibrous cords beneath the skin, constricting the tendons and causing one or more fingers to bend inward toward the palm.

    This condition often takes years to develop. One of the first signs of Dupuytren’s is a thickening of palm tissue. In time, you may notice puckering or dimples in the thickened tissue. Small knots of eventually form beneath the skin of your palm. These lumps are not especially painful, but they may hurt when pressed. The lumps slowly grow into cords that extend along the palm of your hand and up into the fingers. The ring and pinky fingers are the most often affected. You may lose your grip strength and have trouble holding onto objects.

    Understanding Gamer's Thumb, Prevention, and Treatment

    Understanding Gamer's Thumb, Prevention, and Treatment

    Gamer's Thumb involves the inflammation of the fluid-filled sheath or tunnel (called the synovium) that surrounds the two tendons that control movement of the thumb. You may hear it referred to as flexor tenosynovitis, stenosing tenosynovitis, de Quervain's tenosynovitis (dih-kwer-VAINS ten-oh-sine-oh-VIE-tis), or de Quervain syndrome.

    Two common stenosing tenosyonvitis diagnoses are:

    • DeQuervain's Syndrome - this involves the first dorsal compartment of the wrist
    • Trigger finger - this occurs when a fibrous nodule develops in the digital flexor tendon