Rolling With It

Connecting With Purpose

Connecting With Purpose

Answer some fun questions about yourself to find the intersection of how you are wired & how you are inspired. Connecting with purpose can have a measurable impact on your life, health and lifespan.  Jes runs through a less than 14 minute dorky run-through of one of our Lunch & Learns: Connecting with Purpose.

For those of you who are ready to dive in, here is what you need:

  • Pen and paper
  • Ability to draw a Venn Diagram
  • Some trigger-finger-ready mouse action (actually, you'l have plenty of time to hit pause) so you can answer my questions
  • This link, for when I ask you about your core values (free resource)
  • This link, for when I ask you about your personality type (free resource)
  • A tolerance for puns (or brace yourself)
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The Uplifting Tale of OSS Weightlifting

The Uplifting Tale of OSS Weightlifting

A decade ago, a Men’s Health article caught the eyes of retired federal agent Mario Dispenza, who was, at the time, looking for something new in training. Having been active with cardio and weights all his life, he was drawn to the claim “the greatest workout known to man,” so he picked up their piece about Olympic Weightlifting. Mario found the  sport to be quite captivating, and the article spurred him to find a local USAW coach. Soon he was hooked.

Olympic Weightlifting is about sport: the bar is lifted overhead in a fast, explosive movement. Body mechanics are key. Olympic Weightlifters train to become more efficient with the bar, to better harness their strength and grow their personal records (PR’s).  In the sport of Olympic weightlifting, there are two lifts: the snatch and the clean and jerk.  The snatch is performed with a wide grip.  The bar is lifted overhead in one single motion.  

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Natural Help for Plantar Fasciitis

Natural Help for Plantar Fasciitis

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis occurs in in the heel and sole of the feet. When you first get up after a night’s sleep or a daytime rest, you experience sharp pain when putting weight on these areas. Flexing your foot may also trigger pain from plantar fasciitis. About one-third of those with the condition are affected in both feet but most have it in only one. Plantar fasciitis develops slowly over time, usually originating in the heel and moving forward toward the toes. You can often alleviate your symptoms without extreme measures like surgery. The name of the malady comes from the plantar area, or sole, of your foot and the connecting tissue, or fascia, that extends from your heel to your toes. The tissue sustains minute tears that become inflamed, thus causing pain along the length of your foot.

What Are the Symptoms?

Pain in the heel and sole of your foot when you walk is the primary symptom of plantar fasciitis. People typically do not run a fever or have other noticeable symptoms. The most severe pain occurs when you first get up, and it tends to lessen as the fascia and muscles warm up. However, if you remain on your feet for most of the day, the pain will worsen as the day goes on. Climbing stairs may cause a flare-up. Getting off your feet will ease the discomfort. If the pain continues during the night when you are in bed, you may not have plantar fasciitis. Instead, you may have arthritis, a pinched nerve, tarsal tunnel syndrome or a foot injury.

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Is Active Sitting Good for You?

Is Active Sitting Good for You?

Yes, Active Sitting Can Benefit Your Body

People with desk jobs are tired of sitting all day. So much so, in fact, that many are bringing their gym equipment to work with them in the effort to combine the daily grind with fitness. In a surprising leap of innovation, people from executives to administrative assistants are swapping out their office chairs for fitness balls in the effort to tone their glutes and quads while alleviating the aches and pains that sedentary work can cause, says Prevention magazine.

Why Traditional Office Chairs Cause Pain

One reason office chairs seem so uncomfortable is the result of poor posture. When you sit down to work each day, your body settles in, your abdominal muscles relax and your core muscles take a break. The seat of the chair, no matter how ergonomically designed, bears the brunt of your body weight. Poor posture means your body is not naturally aligned, and when you sit for extended periods in misalignment, your muscular and skeletal structures suffer, according to Prevention.


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Sitting is the New Smoking?

Sitting is the New Smoking?

You might have heard “sitting is the new smoking” lately (or seen the hashtag #sittingisthenewsmoking), and if you haven't, it’s probably time to research it for yourself and make decisions with the facts it mind.


To compare sitting to smoking may seem like a harsh comparison because 480,000 people a year die from smoking, and you might be thinking “Are 480,000 people really dying a year or will be dying per year from sitting?”

Well… No. Not exactly, but perhaps we should all start reflecting on how many sedentary hours in our lives we can begin to modify.

For a brief time in my life I had a personal trainer who always steered me in the right direction. One day he asked me who had a better metabolism: middle school teachers or individuals who spent two hours at the gym every night? Anticipating the plot twist, I firmly stated “teachers” with as much false confidence one could have with fingers spread in high plank and watching beads of her own sweat fall to the mat 90 seconds in.

“Right, but do you know why?” He asked, and of course, I didn’t.

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